The work of Jean Charasse has always been marked by a relationship to structure, even if, paradoxically, in its figurative beginnings, this structure could be hidden, coded, from the elementary structures of kinship, in the Western way.

Alexandre de la Salle, Cagnes sur mer, August 2011.

Construction P4A, 2020

technique mixte bois et textile

prix sur demande

 

Construction P9A, 2017

technique mixte, 65 x 51 x 17.5 cm

5000 euros

Construction P2A, 2015

technique mixte bois et textile, 33 x 26 x 5 cm

2800 euros

Construction P4A, 2016

bois et textile, 18 x 13 x 4.5 cm

2000 euros

Construction P2A, 2016

technique mixte bois et textile 33 x 26 x 5 cm

2800 euros

Construction P4A, 2017

bois et textile, 40 x 34 x 5 cm

3500 euros

Construction P9A, 2017

bois et textile, 40 x 34 x 4.5 cm

3500 euros

Construction 12 P2, 2015

technique mixte bois et textile

20 000 euros

 

Construction P4C, 2016

bois et textile, 65 x 51 x 7.5 cm

Construction P7A, 2015

technique mixte sur bois, 48 x 26 x 7.5 cm

Construction P8B, 2013

technique mixte sur bois, 29 x 13.5 x 6.5 cm

Construction P7F, 2012

technique mixte sur bois, 29 x 13.5 x 6.5 cm

 

Construction P11, 2011,

technique mixte sur bois, 29 x 13.5 x 6.5 cm

Construction P8C, 2011

technique mixte sur bois, 29 x 13.5 x 6.5 cm

Construction P9, 2011

technique mixte sur bois, 29 x 13.5 x 6.5 cm

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Jean Charasse was born in Lapalisse in France in 1941, his studies led him to work in the building industry. Self-taught, he started painting at the age of fifteen and began exhibiting in 1977. He gradually abandoned figurative painting to devote himself to the composition of constructions in which he used all kinds of recycled materials, wood, rusty irons and fabrics; this would be his “Signals and Beacons” period. At the Alexandre de la Salle Gallery in Saint Paul de Vence, he discovered the work of Aurélie Nemours and met Carmelo Arden Quin (founder of the MADI Movement in Buenos Aires in 1946); a path was set for his work, that of Built Art. In 2004, Carmelo Arden Quin accepted her as a member of the MADI Movement. He simplifies his constructions for geometrical compositions in wood, made up of parallelepipedal elements that fit together and overlap each other. In his latest work, he covers geometrical elements in wood, previously fixed to a background, with a veil of fabric; the tension exerted on the fabric reveals the surface of the “buried” parts in filigree, and he interposes visible elements that maintain the architecture of the whole. After several layers of medium the construction, depending on the lighting, reveals itself in an agreement between hidden and revealed.

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